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Dobs4ever

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Posts posted by Dobs4ever


  1. Results of my Leeba/Stone breeding Born 1-7-2020 projected was 34% if I remember correctly. Breeder tool is not working this morning so I could not verify.

    Leeba was clear of all variants when I did the breeding but when it was updated she is DCM2 carrier

    Stone is Vwd carrier so thank Goodness I did not double up on DCM 2. I don’t mind a carrier but I would never intentionally breed and double up.

    1. Red Collar girl 34% High Diversity Vwd, DCM 2 carrier
    2. Purple collar girl 33% High Diversity Vwd carrier
    3. Black Collar boy 33% No diversity Vwd, Alt carrier
    4. Drk Blue Boy 29% No Diversity DCM 2 carrier
    5. Lt Blue Boy 30% No diversity Vwd, DCM 2 carrier
    6. Blue Starman 29% High diversity DCM 2 carrier
    7. Drk Green Boy 30% High diversity Vwd, DCM 2 carrier
    8. Red Male 29% No Diversity Alt carrier

    To add: I found it interesting that I did not have any higher than 34% COI's. And both Leeba and Stone are out of my long term breeding program.


  2. UDC Nationals 2020 is marching on:

    The dates for this years National are May 26-May 30 in Columbiana Ohio. More coming soon.

    Conformation judges
    Nancy Christensen and TT evaluator
    Jackie Matson and Breed Survey
    Gerardo Heredia IPG and conformation

    The host hotel is the Best Western Plus Dutch Haus Inn and Suites
    150 SR-14
    Columbiana, Ohio 44408
    Please wait to make reservatons until all if finalized to get the best price.

    The majority of the Nationals event will be held at the American Legion Post 290
    44403 OH-14
    Columbiana, Ohio 44408

    If weather is bad, we will host some of the obedience and conformation shows in an indoor very close by called the Next Level Sports Complex
    2112 Waterford Rd
    New Waterford, Ohio 44445


  3. For those interested the Vita Nova Doberman club would like to announce the evaluator for the WAE at the UDC Nationals in Ohio. Evaluator is Zelda Cassanova. I have worked the WAE with Zelda and she is awesome!!!

    Vita Nova Dobermann Club Presents DPCA Working Aptitude Evaluation Date: 5/18/2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dog Limit: 25

    Location: Evaluator: Zelda Casanova Portage County Randolph Fairgrounds 4215 Fairground Rd Atwater, OH 44201

    You can register here at: https://form.jotform.com/90697479393174 Or Mail pre-entries with fees to: Katlyn Schwarzwaelder 186 Taggert Road Darlington, PA 16115

    Eligibility: 1. This event is open to Doberman Pinschers ONLY. 2. Must be 18 months of age or older. 3. Must be AKC registered or have an AKC, CKC, PAL/ILP number. In addition, dogs registered in a foreign country that is on the AKC list of acceptable registries may participate. 4. Bitches in heat are eligible, but will be tested last. 5. Must be of an allowed color. Z factored dogs are eligible with proof of spay/neuter.

    Entries will be accepted in the following order: 1. Champions with Approved Performance Titles (Photocopies required)* 2. Champions or Approved Performance Titles (Photocopies required)* 3. All other registered Dobermans

    Entry Fee: 1. Entry fee is $35.00. Please make checks payable to Nova Dobermann Club. 2. No entry will be accepted without the fee. 3. Pre-registration is strongly recommended, but we will accept same day entries if slots are available. 4. Please plan to arrive at 8:30 AM if you have not pre-registered to complete paperwork.

    Registration and Other Important Information: •Please submit pre-entries using the official DPCA Working Aptitude Evaluation for Temperament Entry Form found on the DPCA website at http://www.dpca.org/awards/wae/documents/WAE-entry-form.pdf •Please provide photocopies of any titles you dog has earned along with your entry. They will not be returned. •Additional information about the WAE can be found on DPCA’s website http://www.dpca.org/awards/wae/index.php •Participants must check in at the registration table between 8:30 AM and 8:45 AM on the morning of the evaluation. •The evaluator will provide an overview and instructions for all participants at 9:00 AM. •No dog shall be allowed on course without a signed Official Entry Form. •An e-mail will be sent participants to confirm the entry has been received.

    Contact Katlyn Schwarzwaelder (412)352-4006, kschwarzy@aol.com if you have any questions.

    UDC2019.jpg


  4. It is in the history books and what a great Fall Classic hosted by the O. G. Edgerton schutzhund Club.  

    Congratulations to all the teams - EVERY single team passed!!!  WAHOO

    Just saw final results for the FALL CLASSIC - Great job everyone!!
    Ashley & Marco 90-83-99
    Simone & Kuno 91-85-98
    Summer & Aiko 99 - 84- 90
    Russ & Magnus 96- 86 -84

    Jason and River 84-83-91

    High tracking was our IPO I team Summer and Aiko with 99 Super job guys

    High Obedience was was our IPO 2 team Russ and Magnus with 86  Super Team work guys!

    High IPO goes to Ashley and Marco IPO 3 with 99-  WHOOP WHOOP!!  great job!

    FallClassicLogo.jpg

    FallClassicresults.jpg


  5. http://www.beefmagazine.com/ranching/world-without-beef-just-not-sustainable

    This is an excellent article on how to approach the controversy between the vegans of the world and the food growers of the world.  The fight is real as vegans have a very strong message and campaign that says meat production is unhealthy and dangerous to the planet.  They have a meatless Monday campaigns, youTube videos that are edited in their favor, and heart wrenching stories and numerous other bizarre antics depicting a heavily slanted message.  They have even infiltrated our schools with their messages.

     

    (quote) 

    For those who are on the fence about beef in the diet, Sara Place, Ph.D., NCBA senior director, sustainable beef production research, puts to rest some of the most common misconceptions about livestock in a sustainable food system.

    In a recent article featured on medium.com, Place explains how the latest research proves that an animal-free food system is just not holistically sustainable.

    Place writes, “Let’s be clear, a healthy and sustainable food system depends on having both plants and animals. Researchers at USDA’s Agricultural Research Service and Virginia Tech just published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences confirming this socially debated fact. The study examined what our world would look like without animal agriculture in the U.S. The bottom line? We’d reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. by 2.6%, and 0.36% globally — but we’d also upset our balanced food ecosystem and lack essential dietary nutrients to feed all Americans.”

    Here are three main points Place makes in her article:

    1. Cattle consume food that is inedible by humans

    Place says, “One important role livestock — such as cattle — play in our sustainable food system is taking human inedible food and ultimately making it nutritious. Specifically, cattle act as upcyclers — meaning they eat grasses and plant matter leftover from human food production and upgrade them into nutritional, high-quality protein. In fact, they produce 19% more edible protein than they consume.”

    2. Cattle graze on land that is unsuitable for anything else

    Place writes, “More than 85% of the land where we graze cattle is not suitable for growing crops because it is too rocky, steep and/or arid to support cultivated agriculture.”

    3. Organic foods benefit from cattle manure

    “If you eat a USDA-certified organic diet, what’s one of the major fertilizer sources for your vegetables, grains, and other plant foods? Animal manure. What consumes 1.9 billion pounds a year of plant-based leftovers produced by the U.S. human food, fiber, and biofuel industries? Livestock. Without livestock, how would we dispose of these plant-derived leftovers without creating an environmental problem?" (quote)

    We need to educate ourselves and have a sensible plan of attack.  We need to be in our schools educating students on the benefits of our agriculture, animal husbandry and how to feed a growing population.  It will not be sustainable on just plant crops that's for sure.  

    Dobs4ever- Dogs under fire

    Copyright © 2010 Suzan Shipp/Dobs4ever. All rights reserved. Revised: ALL PICTURES AND CONTENT ON THIS BLOG ARE THE SOLE PROPERTY OF Suzan Shipp/Dobs4ever/J Bar S Dobermans and may not be used, copied or reprinted without express permission from the owner. Copyrighted 2010

     

     


  6. http://www.beefmagazine.com/ranching/world-without-beef-just-not-sustainable

    This is an excellent article on how to approach the controversy between the vegans of the world and the food growers of the world.  The fight is real as vegans have a very strong message and campaign that says meat production is unhealthy and dangerous to the planet.  They have a meatless Monday campaigns, youTube videos that are edited in their favor, and heart wrenching stories and numerous other bizarre antics depicting a heavily slanted message.  They have even infiltrated our schools with their messages.

     

    (quote) 

    For those who are on the fence about beef in the diet, Sara Place, Ph.D., NCBA senior director, sustainable beef production research, puts to rest some of the most common misconceptions about livestock in a sustainable food system.

    In a recent article featured on medium.com, Place explains how the latest research proves that an animal-free food system is just not holistically sustainable.

    Place writes, “Let’s be clear, a healthy and sustainable food system depends on having both plants and animals. Researchers at USDA’s Agricultural Research Service and Virginia Tech just published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences confirming this socially debated fact. The study examined what our world would look like without animal agriculture in the U.S. The bottom line? We’d reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. by 2.6%, and 0.36% globally — but we’d also upset our balanced food ecosystem and lack essential dietary nutrients to feed all Americans.”

    Here are three main points Place makes in her article:

    1. Cattle consume food that is inedible by humans

    Place says, “One important role livestock — such as cattle — play in our sustainable food system is taking human inedible food and ultimately making it nutritious. Specifically, cattle act as upcyclers — meaning they eat grasses and plant matter leftover from human food production and upgrade them into nutritional, high-quality protein. In fact, they produce 19% more edible protein than they consume.”

    2. Cattle graze on land that is unsuitable for anything else

    Place writes, “More than 85% of the land where we graze cattle is not suitable for growing crops because it is too rocky, steep and/or arid to support cultivated agriculture.”

    3. Organic foods benefit from cattle manure

    “If you eat a USDA-certified organic diet, what’s one of the major fertilizer sources for your vegetables, grains, and other plant foods? Animal manure. What consumes 1.9 billion pounds a year of plant-based leftovers produced by the U.S. human food, fiber, and biofuel industries? Livestock. Without livestock, how would we dispose of these plant-derived leftovers without creating an environmental problem?" (quote)

    We need to educate ourselves and have a sensible plan of attack.  We need to be in our schools educating students on the benefits of our agriculture, animal husbandry and how to feed a growing population.  It will not be sustainable on just plant crops that's for sure.  

    Dobs4ever- Dogs under fire

    Copyright © 2010 Suzan Shipp/Dobs4ever. All rights reserved. Revised: ALL PICTURES AND CONTENT ON THIS BLOG ARE THE SOLE PROPERTY OF Suzan Shipp/Dobs4ever/J Bar S Dobermans and may not be used, copied or reprinted without express permission from the owner. Copyrighted 2010

     

     



  7. There are a lot of different ideas on proper socialization especially with a working breed.  Some want the dog to be very territorial so keep the dog at home and sheltered, but from what I have seen this makes a fear biter not necessarily a safe companion.  The more things and people you expose a dog to the more confident he becomes and does not have to feel that his little back yard is all there is and he must defend it with his life.   While I want my dogs to know how to properly behave in another dogs presence I personally do not care if they ever play with anyone's dogs other than my own. Right of the bat I will tell you I do not favor dog parks. I feel that they are a law suit waiting to happen.  I said that the first time I ever heard of one and have not changed my mind.  Your dog may be fine, but I do not trust other folks or their dogs. It is MY job to protect and train my puppy.  

    The ideal situation is to take your puppy with you as much as you can. This will expose him to new situations and help to build confidence when in new or strange places or when meeting new people.  I start my training immediately.  I take the puppy to what I consider "safe" places - places where there are not a risk of multiple dogs roaming.  I have never held a puppy back due to lack of completed vaccinations.  The period of socialization is too important to let is slide by.  So what are my guidelines -  FULL sun,  wide open grass areas, concrete, places where other dogs do not normally frequent.  Yes I do take puppies into dog stores but I do not potty them in any area where it is obvious other dogs have gone potty - Remember these things I consider key to for the puppies safety s FULL sun exposure ----concrete and BLEACH is your best friend.

    Proper way to introduce a new puppy to the home if there is an older dog -

       Do not introduce the puppy to the older dog at home.  This is the older dog's territory and can set him off with the puppy having a very bad experience.  They should meet at a neutral location with both on leash.  Let them meet and greet then take them for a long walk (15 to 20 minutes minimum)  and then take them home.  The older dog should remain on leash and under your control.  They puppy can be turned loose but I would leave the leash on.  Let the puppy approach the older dog not the other way around.  A bigger older dog running at a puppy could frighten the puppy and create an issue that was not necessary.  Never would I let a puppy meet any older dog that was not on leash and under control.  If the big dog reacts the puppy can safely get away.  If the big dog is loose you have a problem if it approaches the puppy to fast it could scare the puppy.  This is true for any large or small mature dog the puppy might meet.  They should always be on leash and let the puppy do the approaching.  Once they get to know each other then it should be fine for them to play together as long as they get along well.  I would not let them together unsupervised.  There is a risk of them running and accidently tumbling the puppy resulting in a broken bone.  

    I could not speak about socialization if I did not address  those of you who worry about Parvo.  You need to understand it is everywhere in the environment and it mutates every year.  At best the parvo vaccine is only 75% affective.  They claim a puppy is not protected from parvo until their final puppy shot at 4 months. Fact is I have known dogs that were not exposed to other dogs and fully vaccinated come down with parvo.  Yes it is ugly and it is deadly.  Use caution.  Using my formula above I have never had a problem with parvo.  

    So even before their final puppy shots I try to take the puppy to new places at least 2 or 3 times a week.  I am just a lot more cautious. I don't let the puppy down on the ground in areas where other dogs have been. Ex: if I am traveling and the puppy needs to take a potty break I don't stop at a rest area. I know that many dogs have frequented those places, therefore, I will stop at an exit with little traffic and no gas station if possible.  I figure it is less likely that a puppy has wandered around by the interstate.

    Parvo lives in the ground for 2 to 3 years. Once you have contracted it you cannot bring another puppy onto the premises unless you want to do a thorough sterilization. That means get new carpet, disinfect the walls or any area that the sick puppy touched, bleach your shoes and wash your clothing with bleach.  If you want to decontaminate your yard then that means burn it off.  That is a big hassle.

    Okay that is enough about caution………on to SOCIALIZATION! The fact is the more outside things you acquaint your puppy with the more things he will have the confidence to handle. He needs two very important social skills:  Good manners around other people and good manners around other dogs.

    The best time to start obedience classes is before a lot of unwanted behavior develops.  12 weeks is not too young.  It will build your confidence as a new puppy owner and build communication skills between you and your puppy which strengthens your bond. I strongly recommend obedience classes for two main reasons.         a..  It gets the puppy into a new environment                                                                                                                                                                b.  The puppy gets to learn to work with distractions and this helps the puppy learn to focus on you.                                                                      c.  It helps you build a stronger bond with your new puppy                                                                                                                                            d.  It helps advance maturity by improving focus

    1. He needs to meet lots of people and learn that they are friends and to be treated as such. No growling, shying, lunging or jumping up.
    Meeting other people is important to build his confidence and to help him overcome fear of other people. You want him comfortable with other people and build confidence.  This will help eliminate fear biting because the poor dog has not been allowed to socialize properly.

    2. He needs to meet other dogs and learn proper dog behavior - this does not mean he needs a playmate or to run and play with other dogs.  All dogs speak the same language so you have to ask yourself do you want a relationship with your dog or do you want your dog to be more interested in his own kind.

    Meeting other dogs (and having free time to romp and play will teach him doggie play. Doggie play and people play are two different kinds of playing. I do not consider this critical to a well mannered dog.  As long as I have a well mannered dog who is not reactive when I meet strange dogs I am fine.  If you compete I have found that letting your dog play with other dogs makes it harder in competition as he thinks it is play time.  Just a thought to consider.

    Copyright © 2010 Suzan Shipp/Dobs4ever. All rights reserved. Revised: ALL PICTURES AND CONTENT ON THIS BLOG ARE THE SOLE PROPERTY OF Suzan Shipp/Dobs4ever/J Bar S Dobermans and may not be used, copied or reprinted without express permission from the owner. Copyrighted 2010


  8. Crate Training

    Let me just say this about crate training……….It is NOT AN OPTION. Don't be cheap, just go get a crate big enough for your puppy to grow into and USE IT. It will be one of your best investments.

    For my male Dobes I use a crate that is 40" X 27" X 30". females 36" X 24 X 30". This gives them room to move and lie down. I only recommend the plastic crate like a Vari Kennel, or Porta Pet. I do NOT recommend or use ever the wire cage except at dog shows and in the car. It is just too easy for a puppy to get a toenail hung up and ripped out, a collar hung up or in the case of Dobes- those ears while wrapped. Should your puppy have an accident the plastic crate is very easy to clean. The wire mesh is too easy to spill on the floor when trying to empty it so it runs through onto the floor, carpet etc. While the puppy is little I block off the back half of the crate so that he doesn't have room to move around and potty.

    Dogs are naturally a den animal so the CRATE is NOT cruel. It gives them a sense of security and safety. It gives you peace of mind, allows you to better control the house breaking process, and eliminates the frustration of coming home and finding the couch scattered all over the living room floor, shoes chewed or vases broken etc. 

    I have found that puppies that are properly crate trained do NOT suffer from the separation anxiety like a dog that is not crate trained. So if you don't have one GET ONE before you bring the puppy home. Hopefully your breeder used a crate so it will not be a foreign object to the puppy.

    When I put the puppy in the crate during the day I always give a good rawhide chew toy and a doggie bone. This makes it a pleasant experience and keeps the puppy busy for the first few minutes. This helps them settle right down. I say: "Kennel up" as they go in to build a command for when I want them to go into something. This will help when loading in a car. I say: "Kennel up" when I want them to jump into the back of the SUV or truck.

    If you are leaving during the day, put the puppy in the crate with a treat as described above. 

    Now lets talk about the coming home. I don't make it a big deal because we have WORK to do BEFORE we greet. Upon arriving home I may go straight to the crate or I may make a pit stop first then open the door and say: OUT let's go OUT. I take the puppy out and follow the steps as explained in the House Breaking section.

    When we come back inside we have our greeting that is their praise for being a good dog and going outside. If it is dinnertime we simply proceed to feeding. If you are doing your praising often when they do what you have asked, and you spend plenty of time with them playing etc. then coming home should NOT be a big deal. It is just another step in our schedule. NO baby talking and making sad sounds because you are leaving. This is what triggers anxiety.  You are telling the dog its is a sad or worrisome time.  Same with greeting when you return.  Set the puppy up for success from the beginning.  

    A BIG greeting upon arriving home or a long sad drawn out leaving causes anxiety trauma. So Kennel Up on leaving with a treat and Out when arriving home. This establishes the routine and builds security for the puppy.

    Until 6 months of age I would not leave a puppy for the entire day. 4 hours max. Schedule your lunch hour to come home and let the puppy out if you must work.  By 6 months the puppy should be able to make it though the day or night without having an accident in their crate.

    If you cannot come home or the puppy can't make it through the night (& you don't want to get up and take them out) then you will need to set up an area where you can confine the puppy with his crate and a small area for him to come out and potty. Put lots of papers down. After this the same principles apply. Take the puppy outside for potty and duty immediately upon awaking or coming home. Clean up the papers when the puppy is outside. Do not let the puppy see you cleaning up the mess.

    Now the BIG KEY is once the puppy is placed in the crate no amount of howling, barking or throwing a fit will get the puppy ANY attention. That means you do not look at the puppy, you do not speak to the puppy in any way, you do not go to the puppy and give another toy……………..IT MEANS YOU COMPLETELY IGNORE THE PUPPY AS IF IT WASN'T EVEN THERE! That is final, no discussion.

    This puppy depends on you for guidance and you want to build a strong bond of trust and loyalty. How you handle these situations determines the out come for the rest of the dogs life. How you handle this training is the difference in making a loving trusting well behaved pet that is a pleasure to have around and others admire, or creating a nightmare. Either way it is YOU who makes the difference. 

    No one can guarantee that they can always be there to take care of things.  So I personally do not see a crate as only a puppy tool. It is for on going training.  A dogs should have times during the week when they are crated.  Then if you ever have to leave the dog with someone else they will be safe and easy to manage because they are very comfortable in their crate.  A dog that suffers from separation anxiety never learned to be comfortable in its own skin but feels it must have constant attention.  No one can give constant attention 24/7.  This is an unreasonable expectation and will fail at some point.

    You can take ANY puppy and properly socialize it, teach it some basic manners and have a dog that is a pleasure to be around. Neglect this while it is little and the job is 10 times harder after 6 months because the dog has established his OWN idea of how things are suppose to be.  

    Copyright © 2010 Suzan Shipp/Dobs4ever. All rights reserved. Revised: ALL PICTURES AND CONTENT ON THIS BLOG ARE THE SOLE PROPERTY OF Suzan Shipp/J Bar S Dobermans and may not be used, copied or reprinted without express permission from the owner. Copyrighted 2010


  9. https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/vbpn34/ten-questions-you-always-wanted-to-ask-an-animal-rights-activist

    Ten Questions You Always Wanted to Ask an Animal Rights Activist

    "On the most basic level, a human's life is not worth more than an animal's life."

    This article originally appeared VICE Denmark.

    Casper Hilt is a social worker and animal rights activist from Copenhagen. The 35-year-old is the founding director of the group Fremtiden er Vegansk (The Future Is Vegan), and an active member of animal rights organizations Anonymous for the Voiceless, Go Vegan, and Direct Action Everywhere.

    Hilt spends most of his time organizing protests and campaigns aimed at informing the people of Denmark about the plight of animals in industrialized farming. "Animals feel things, just like you and I. They suffer every day, all over the world, for no reason whatsoever," he tells me. "People label me as an extremist or a fanatic. Either that or I’m sanctimonious and have a holier-than-thou attitude. But the only difference between me and those people is that I recognize the fact that animals suffer, due to our taste for their flesh. That's what I want people to understand."

    I spoke to Hilt about whether he thinks an animal's life is worth the same as a human's, whether you can be prejudiced against a chicken, and if keeping pets is wrong.

    VICE: How do you feel about slaughtering animals, but treating them humanely during their lives?
    Casper Hilt: 
    Try turning that around. If someone is killed in the prime of his or her life, the automatic response isn't, "Well, it's a good thing they died while they were young and happy."

    So do you think the life of an animal is just as important as a human's life? 
    Honestly, there's no easy answer here—you have to factor a lot in. Is the life of a terrible person worth more than your pet dog? On the most basic level, a human's life is not worth more than an animal's life, but in the end, it's much more complicated than that.

    If you could only save one, would you save the life of a chicken or a baby? 
    That's an impossible question to answer. I guess my heart would tell me to save the baby because it resembles me and I can relate to it. But I would do everything in my power to save both. And if I couldn't save both, it would haunt me for the rest of my life.

    Are there any people you wouldn’t save over the life of an animal? 
    It's a pretty unrealistic scenario, but for the sake of the argument, lets take some random animal, like a two-year-old wild boar, and a convicted serial killer. In that hypothetical situation, I would say that it's not just about who they are, but also about what they've done. And considering the boar would never wilfully harm anyone, I'd probably save the animal. But the decision would still haunt me.

    In your campaigns, you talk a lot about speciesism. As a carnivore, am I a speciesist? 
    Speciesism means that you condone the poor treatment of other living beings simply because they belong to a different species. It's at the root of the specific kind of evil that I campaign against. It's the dominant culture and ideology, and the reason why you love and protect your dog but have no qualms about a pig having to die a gruesome death so you can eat it. From a logical standpoint, it makes no sense—it assigns animals a lower value just because they are of a different species. It's the same skewed logic as with sexism and racism, but I think speciesism predates both. 

    So yes, you are a speciesist, but it's probably not a conscious decision on your part. We're all raised in a society that condones the mistreatment of some animals.

    In the past, you've compared eating meat to the Holocaust. Why? 
    I very rarely make that comparison. I want to make it extremely clear that in saying that, I am in no way comparing Jewish people to animals. I would never do that. I have, however, compared the crimes committed against Jewish people during WWII to the way pigs are treated today. I think the atrocious treatment is the same—the difference to me is that the victims look different and operate on different levels of consciousness.

    So if you consider pork production to be a form of genocide, shouldn't you be doing a lot more to end it? 
    I ask myself that every day. As an activist, you can easily trap yourself in a wicked spiral of self-doubt, where you keep questioning whether or not you are doing enough for the cause. One vegan can't change the world, but I am one amongst millions and we are growing in numbers by the day. Eventually, we'll change the world.

    What's your opinion on keeping pets? 
    If the animal has been rescued from a cruel fate, then I think it's OK. But buying another individual for companionship is, in my view, no better than buying them for entertainment purposes or for food. I think it's fine to get a dog from a pound, but not from a breeder. Breeding is never in the interest of the animal.

    So do you think keeping a hamster in a cage is the same as keeping a child locked up in a basement? 
    The short answer is yes. I think the experience is the same because both will experience emotional stress, anxiety, and grief. But humans have the cognitive ability to conceptualize freedom and hope. And as far as we know, animals don't. So I'd say being incarcerated is worse for them because it's a never-ending experience. Think about it—would you rather be locked up with or without at least the hope of being able to escape?......................................

    If you can stomach the rest of the article you will find it at the link posted above.  I personally have never read such drivel in my life.  By nature GOD created and ordained animals to be used by man.  He did give instructions that they were to be treated fairly and with respect even those created to provide food for man.  JMHO

    Dobs4ever-  Dogs under Fire All opinions are my own and not necessarily the opinions or beliefs of the forum owners

    Copyright © 2010 Suzan Shipp/Dobs4ever. All rights reserved. Revised: ALL PICTURES AND CONTENT ON THIS BLOG ARE THE SOLE PROPERTY OF Suzan Shipp/Dobs4ever/J Bar S Dobermans and may not be used, copied or reprinted without express permission from the owner. Copyrighted 2010

     


  10. I have often been asked when is the best time to start training my puppy and my response is TODAY!  A young puppy has a strong desire to please and discover their place in the home.  There are some basics that make it easier for the puppy and you.  

    Remember - they are a baby - patience patience patience

    It all starts with a schedule and proper supervision.  If something goes wrong it is your fault NOT THE PUPPY.  If the puppy out then I MUST supervise.

    All puppies should be properly trained, house broken, crate trained and socialized. These things are essential to a confident happy puppy and peace in the home.

     My SCHEDULE LOOKS SOMETHING LIKE THIS: 

    • 6:30 AM -- Take puppy outside for potty.
      6:45 AM -- Bring puppy inside and feed.
      7:00 AM --  Come in and have inside play time (training)  Training is part of play time at this age.
      7:30 AM -- Take puppy outside for potty and duty time
      7:50 AM -- Puppy goes on leash at computer while I check e mails etc.

      8:30 AM -- Get ready for work….puppy is on leash at my side.
      8:50 AM -- Take puppy outside to potty.
      9:00 AM -- Have puppy "kennel up" & give treats - leave for work

      12:00 PM - Come home and take puppy out to potty
      12:10 PM - Feed puppy and fix my lunch
      12:30 PM - Take puppy outside and let them run around and explore, play and potty
      1:00 PM - Bring puppy in to "kennel up" give treats.

      5:30 PM - Take puppy outside for potty and free play time(30 Min)
      6:00 PM - Feed puppy 6:15 PM - Outside for potty and play time. (ball, fetch etc) weather permitting if not play inside.

      7:15 PM - Last drink of water for the night offered after play
      7:30 PM - Outside to potty
    • 7:45 PM - Quiet time with puppy sitting on couch or watch TV at computer. Can work on sit, come down, stay etc. 
      8:15 PM - Outside to potty
      8:30 PM - Let puppy play in play area by himself. Give chew treat 9:15 PM - Take puppy outside for potty and bed time.

      10:30 PM - Take puppy outside for final outing of night
      10:45 PM - Crate for the night (at 12 to 14 weeks puppy should make it til 5 AM)


       
    •  

  11.  

    First and foremost a breeder needs  a strong character because they will need it.  Truth, honesty and understanding rank above all.  If you have these three things then you are on the right path. Don't be blinded by a beautiful web site - it is advertising and propaganda to a point.  Sometimes someone is good until a problem arises.  This makes it hard when selecting a "new" breeder.  They old saying is true - You have to earn their stripes.

    A good place to start looking for a breeder is the DPCA breeder referral or the UDC breeder referral.

    1.  Member of the breed club - I believe this shows the breeder wants to be responsible and follow the standard. It also shows that they support the breed club of our country and are willing to do  their best to breed to that standard. No "oversized" as it is not superior - it comes with a greater chance of health issues   Oversized is not quick and agile, it is slow and lumbering. Remember FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION.  Our breed is a medium sized dog and should be balanced in both conformation and drives.

    2.  Have shown, trained and titled their own dogs not just brag about someone else's hard work.  I see far too many who brag about the great dogs in their pedigree, but have no clue what or how it actually applies to the dog they have in front of them.  A purebred, and especially a working breed should be proven.  This sets a breeder on a path that will give then more knowledge about temperament and conformation than breeding 1,000 litters ever can.  It prepares them to answer a question  a perspective family might have if a problem arises.

    3.  Health test -  and that is not a vet check.  There are currently DNA test for Vwd, PDK4, Degenerative M, Dings, DCM2 (still in question).  And the newest is the Diversity programs which give the COI in any breeding if both dogs are tested.  All, and especially European breeding should  be tested for eyes PRA (progressive retinal atrophy).  Hip dysplasia, Thyroid and heart check with NT PRO BNP, echo and/or holter. While dogs are allowed to be bred as young as 18 months before all these test are done or any titling of the dogs involved, it is not recommended.  It is recommended that they not be bred prior to 2 years.  Beware the breeder who breeds two young dogs without solid health testing and no titling of their own dogs.  It is important to understand as best as possible the pedigree and longevity of the dogs behind the breeding pair.  

    4.  Has a contract that clearly spells out the agreement and will stand behind what they produce, taking any dog back to prevent it from ending up in rescue or a shelter.

    5.  Always willing to communicate and respond - it is easy to respond to the good things, it takes a strong honest character to respond when something goes wrong.  We owe the dogs our loyalty and must take of our families.  

    6.  A good breeder crops the ears before the puppy leaves.  It is harder and harder to find a good vet who knows how to properly crop a puppies ears.  This should not be left to chance.  The breeder should know a good vet and should take care of it prior to the puppy leaving for its new home.  I have always felt it terrible to take a puppy away from the only home it has ever known and its littermates, send it to strangers and then they try to find a good vet to crop.  It is much easier on the puppy if he returns to a familiar home with his littermates.  The cropping really does not phase them as the comfort each other.  Then you know they get a great crop the first time around.  Usually puppies are cropped at 7 weeks as this give optimum time for the ears to stand.  Puppies should stay with the breeder until the stitches are out and the ears are healed and ready to post.  They are then ready to go on their new venture to their families.

    SOME IMMEDIATE RED FLAGS:

    A.  Anyone who advertises health testing as CLEAR on cardio - there is no such thing.  Cardio has been a very elusive disease and can rear it's ugly head at anytime regardless of how many test you have run. The 2 cardio genes have proven very disappointing  and are no indication of the dog being CLEAR of cardio.  Listing any health test as "pending" What a joke.  It usually takes 2 to 3 weeks to get DNA test back surely they can wait until they have official results.  At best with today's test we can say at the time of testing the results were within normal range.  Most dogs do not show signs of a problem until around 5 years of age.  So basically testing means nothing other than it would allow one to catch a dog that showed signs earlier and remove from the gene pool

    B.  Advertising dogs as good for show or working prospect when they have not titled their own dogs in anything is a sales pitch.  It takes years of studying and watching how the dogs grow and develop before one can correctly evaluate a puppy for show..  They are counting on someone else's hard work and trying to short cut the learning and understanding necessary to truly know correct conformation and/ or temperament.  Just because you have a good pedigree does not mean they know which dogs to select for best results and not every puppy in a litter will be good for every sport.

    C.  European dogs are healthier - simply not true.  They are showing more inbreeding than the American Dobes at this time.

    D.  Breeding Albino's or z factored   - DPCA has a great article on the albino's here http://dpca.org/albino/albino_about.php

    E.  No Virginia Wolf there is no such thing as a "Warlock" Doberman.  It is a myth or propaganda dreamed up by a very clever breeder to sell her oversized Dobermans.

    There are many things that can fool the first time Doberman buyer because if the breeder has just a little inf, good or bad, it all sounds impressive to the first time buyer as they do not know the standard or the guidelines for good breeding practices.  They ask questions, but too often they don't know enough to ask the right questions or to know what the right answer is so they believe a bunch of BS.  Often times they feel they did their homework, or sometimes, they just want a puppy and are not willing to wait.  I have heard to many horror stories of untold expense when you rush to judgement or think you are "saving" a poor puppy from a sad situation.  Sadly that thinking continues to line the pockets of less than stellar breeders who then disappear and will not longer communicate when a problem arises.   Remember you are buying a family companion and the first step  is to choose the right breeder. 

     

    Shrock 5-09.jpg

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  12. Come and join us April 24 - 28 2018 at the Missouri State Fairgrounds, Sedalia, MO.  Something for everyone-

    3 conformation shows with temperament testing

    3 obedience show      Health clinic     WAE     CGC's

    Breeders workshop   Working Dog workshop and 

    IPO Trial

    UDC National Flyer 2.jpg

    National Schedule.jpg

    UDC2018Logo.jpg


  13.  


    OSSIPEE — A veterinarian hired by the defense in the animal cruelty trial of a Wolfeboro woman testified on Thursday that in her opinion Christina Fay was a responsible dog owner.

    Dr. Samantha Moffitt, who practices at an emergency veterinary clinic in Fredericksburg, Va., said she reached that conclusion after reviewing thousands of pages of records detailing the medical treatments Fay’s dogs had received.

    “These were common ailments that any pet can have and were not life threatening,” Moffitt said of the myriad conditions the state listed in the criminal complaints against Fay.

    “She went above and beyond what most people would do,” Moffitt said, recounting that the records reflect that Fay typically asked for diagnostic tests to be sent to an outside laboratory at greater expense because it provided more information on how to best treat her dogs.

    Fay not only had a primary veterinarian, but also sought treatment for her dogs at a variety of specialists including an orthopedic surgeon and a canine opthamologist.

    “There was no neglect or cruelty with these common ailments,” Moffitt asserted.

    Under questioning by prosecutor Simon Brown, Moffitt said the allegations that the dogs were exposed to high levels of ammonia gas was not supported by any quantitative test.

    “It’s a gas. You can’t see it. I did not see any records indicating that an ammonia test was done,” she said.

    In her work with a task force in her home state of Virginia that aids in raids by federal authorities on cockfighting and dog-fighting rings, Moffitt said, the local fire department uses an inexpensive paper test to determine if ammonia levels pose a threat to the animals or personnel.

    Moffitt, who disclosed that she was being paid $200 an hour plus air fare and lodging, also testified that short of performing a DNA test it was impossible to determine whether the eight fecal samples collected from inside Fay’s home that tested positive for the parasite giardia came from different dogs.

    It is best practice when determining if a dog is infected to collect a sample at the veterinarian’s office where the identity of the animal from which it was taken can be assured, she said. 

    In reviewing records kept by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), Moffitt said, treatment with a dewormer didn’t occur until June 30, about two weeks after seizure of the dogs.

    Under questioning by defense attorney Kent Barker, the veterinarian also focused on allegations in the criminal complaints that Fay’s dogs were suffering from untreated ear infections.

    A waxy build-up or debris in an ear is not proof of an ear infection which can only be determined by cytology in which a cotton swab is placed in the ear to collect a sample that is then placed on a slide and viewed under a microscope to determine if bacteria, yeast, fungus or even mites are present, she said.

    The criminal complaints also fault Fay for failing to treat her dogs infected with papilloma — a contagious wart-causing virus — that Moffitt testified is benign. 

    The defense is expected to rest its case today, and the jury will then hear closing arguments.
     

    Dobs4ever


  14. https://www.hometownsource.com/union_times/free/oppose-the-damaging-king-amendment/article_110d378e-242c-11e8-a558-5b1103e71855.html

    The King Amendment to the Farm Bill, created by Steve King, R-Iowa, not only threatens the well-being and safety of consumers, animals and workers, but also robs states of their ability to create and implement sound agricultural laws in the future.

    This might also be a conflict of interest as Steve King sits on the committee that will be finalizing the bill.

    Continue to read the article at the link above. 

    Dobs4ever

  15.  
    In just six weeks, The HSUS and a coalition of leading farm animal protection organizations will deliver the signatures needed to launch a California ballot measure that The Guardian described as “History in the making.”
     
    That’s fitting, because the ballot and referendum process is a true gem of American politics, a chance for citizens to express their will directly about topics of the greatest social importance. The treatment of farm animals is just that kind of concern, for me, for The HSUS, and for millions of Americans who support our work. As I write this, staff members and volunteers of Prevent Cruelty California are on the ground in the Golden State, working to collect the 600,000 signatures needed by April 21st to qualify this critical measure for the ballot.
    This initiative would go further than any farm animal protection measure ever considered, banning the sale of veal, eggs, and pork from facilities that force animals to spend their entire lives inside cruel and inhumane cages and crates. Opponents of this measure—the veal, egg, and pork industries—have a much harder burden than we do, because they’re going to be stuck arguing that animals are better off when they’re subjected to such cruelties.
     
    Skip to:
     
    Early polling shows that a commanding 72 percent of Californians say they would vote “yes” on this measure on Election Day. With such broad support we are confident about its prospects. But there’s important work to do, right now. With 44 days left, we still need to collect more qualified signatures. The powerful pork, veal, and egg lobbies are already marshaling their war chests, and we know that they will do everything in their power to keep the measure from coming to the ballot.
    We have one thing that they don’t have, however, and that’s you. A base of strong, caring supporters, who understand and believe in our commitment to fight for all animals. If you live in California, please sign up here today and volunteer to collect signatures. And anyone can help by donating to the Prevent California Cruelty campaign. Later this spring, with the signature drive behind us, we’re going to pull out the stops on this epochal campaign, and fight with all of our might to reshape the political, social, and cultural landscape for animals trapped in the miseries of factory farming.
     

     

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